Monday, February 13, 2012

Analog Science Fiction and Fact - April 1, 2012 - Review


I have been reading Analog Science Fiction and Fact since the early 90's. Back in 04, I started subscribing to the e-book edition, on Fictionwise.

However, in the last few years, the subscription option disappeared. I've also gotten lazy about transferring new books to the device, as the usual book just come automatically through WiFi.

I have read the Analog's formatting has improved, and since it is so cheap, to subscribe to it on the Kindle.

I have to say that the new formatting is fairly acceptable. Personally I think that having links to each section, and being able to skip to the next item is almost useless for the magazine, and takes up space, but it is not a problem - on the Kindle. I also read on my Android (Galaxy S), and on it the magazine is pretty awful.

It doesn't remember where I stopped, and neither does it allow highlights. Very annoying!

About this issue:

- The serial was Triggers - by Robert J. Sawyer, which is a writer from who I usually expect good work. This is not an exception, and the story covers a memory link experiment and terrorist attacks. I anxiously await the last part, and will definitely try to get the previous ones.

- The Most Invasive Species - Susan Forest - Nice story about humans meddling with ecosystems (and species) they don't really understand, and messing up. The species feel a bit contrived.

- Ecce Signum - Craig DeLancey - fun and somewhat grandiose story about a group of humans that were modified to think more about the future. I vaguely remember reading the previous stories in the series.

- A Delicate Balance - Kevin J. Anderson - Another great writer, nice concept about a colony with strict population laws. Nice tragic ending.

- You Say You Want a Revolution - Jerry Oltion - Another familiar name, and another story that could have the exact description I used for The Most Invasive Species, above. With the exception that the contrived species concept is a bit cooler as a story plot device.

- Follow Up - Stephen L. Burns - Again, a familiar name, and a nice short story about a surgical experiment. Nice ending.

Overall, very much recommended for fans of shorter SF stories. But that used to be the case with all Analog issues, so I'm not surprised.

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